Resources

Below is a list of local and statewide projects and initiatives working to combat different aspects of the opioid crisis in North Carolina communities.

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Alcohol/Drug Council of North Carolina

ADCNC is a nonprofit organization that runs a 24-hour hotline to help individuals struggling with drug or alcohol misuse. Hotline operators provide listening support and help identify treatment services that can continue to assist callers.

https://www.alcoholdrughelp.org/

ADCNC
800-688-4232 / 919-493-0003
info@alcoholdrughelp.org

Brunswick County Drug Treatment Court

The goal of the drug treatment court is to prevent repeat drug offenses and rehabilitate users. Judges may refer defendants to treatment for substance misuse disorder rather than incarceration.

www.brunswicksheriff.com/resources/addiction-help

Glenda DeBose
910-253-4574
gdebose@coastalhorizons.org

Buncombe County Drug Treatment Court

The goal of the drug treatment court is to prevent repeat drug offenses and rehabilitate users. Judges may refer defendants to treatment for substance misuse disorder rather than incarceration.

Traci Bodford
828-250-6491
traci.bodford@buncombecounty.org

Burke County Health Department

Burke County Health Department has offered a series of educational forums focused on multifaceted solutions to combat the opioid crisis in Burke County.

http://www.burkenc.org/departments/health-department

Burke County Health Department
828-764-9150

Burke Integrated Healthcare

Burke Integrated Healthcare is leading the Burke Population Health Project, which aims to provide support services to the mentally ill, homeless citizens, people recently released from incarceration, and those suffering from substance abuse while still incarcerated. The project’s goal is to improve and increase healthcare for the entire community by reducing recidivism, decreasing substance abuse through diversion and treatment, and improving support systems for the community’s most vulnerable population. Project funding was provided by the Kate B. Reynolds Foundation.

John Waters, Catawba Valley Behavioral Health
828-695-5900

Carolinas Healthcare System – #ThisisSober Campaign

Carolinas Healthcare System (CHS) launched a #ThisIsSober campaign to reduce the stigma of opioid addiction and seeking treatment. CHS shares successful recovery stories with the aim of encouraging more people to seek treatment.

carolinashealthcare.org/thisissober

Claire Simmons
704-631-1076
claire.simmons@carolinashealthcare.org

Carteret County Health Department Grant

The Carteret County Health Department used a $9,000 grant from the North Carolina Injury and Violence Prevention Branch of the Department of Health and Human Services to establish a standing order for naloxone, implement the Controlled Substances Reporting System (CSRS), and raise awareness about prescription drug safety.

http://www.carteretcountync.gov/364/Health-Department

David Jenkins, Director of Carteret County Health Department
252-728-8550
David.jenkins@carteretcountync.gov

Coalition for Model Opioids Practices in Health Systems

The North Carolina Hospital Association and the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services formed the Coalition to help health systems in North Carolina identify best practices and form strategies for addressing the opioid epidemic. The Coalition includes representatives from every hospital in the state, professional groups, and government agencies. Its website also has various resources for public health professionals and policy makers working to combat the opioid crisis.

https://www.ncqualitycenter.org/resources/behavioral-health/behavioral-health-resources/opioid-stewardship/

Jai Kumar
919-677-4157
jkumar@ncha.org

Community Care of Southern Piedmont

Community Care of Southern Piedmont provides educational services to healthcare providers about how to manage the Control Substance Reporting System with delegates or physicians entering in data.

http://www.ccofsp.com/for-providers/information-systems/

Jamie Barnes, Executive Director
704-262-1041
jamiebarnes@ccofsp.com

Cumberland County Drug Treatment Court

The goal of the drug treatment court is to prevent repeat drug offenses and rehabilitate users. Judges may refer defendants to treatment for substance misuse disorder rather than incarceration.

http://www.nccourts.org/County/Cumberland/Courts/Family/DTC/Default.asp

Sanya Eller
910-475-3012
sanya.t.eller@nccourts.org

Drug-Alcohol Abuse Free Iredell Coalition

Drug-Alcohol Abuse Free Iredell Coalition works to reduce prescription drug misuse by raising awareness about the issue and educating the community about safe disposal of unused medications. The Coalition has worked with law enforcement to get permanent drop boxes for unused drugs and worked to equip first responders with naloxone. It is now seeking funding from the local Alcohol Beverage Control (ABC) board.

http://www.pfsiredell.org/index.php/9-coalition/2-drug-abuse-free-iredell-project-lazarus-coalition

Mayor Miles Atkins
704-799-4210
matkins@ci.mooresville.nc.us

Fayetteville Police Department Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD)

LEAD is a pre-booking diversion program developed to address low-level drug crimes. The program allows law enforcement officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drug activity to community-based treatment programs and services, rather than to incarceration or prosecution.

Captain Lars Paul
910-433-1529

Fayetteville Task Force

Led by the Fayetteville Veterans Affairs Medical Center and city officials, the Task Force seeks to convene relevant stakeholders to develop a comprehensive opioid strategy.  The Task Force educates opioid providers about overprescribing, educates the public about substance use disorder and helps those struggling with substance use get treatment.

Elizabeth Goolsby (Fayetteville VA Medical Center Director)
910-822-7059

Forsyth District Attorney’s Office

The Forsyth County District Attorney’s Office has specialized prosecutors for drug offense cases, outlined criteria for treatment diversion and probation officers who help get individuals with substance use disorder into treatment. The Office also engages in outreach to college students to promote the Good Samaritan Law.

District Attorney Jim O'Neill
336-779-6310

Gastonia Police Department Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD)

LEAD is a pre-booking diversion program developed to address low-level drug crimes. The program allows law enforcement officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drug activity to community-based treatment programs and services, rather than to incarceration or prosecution.

Gastonia Police Chief Robert Helton, Jr.
704-866-6890

Generation Rx

Generation Rx offers free resources to educate audiences of different ages and from different environments about the dangers of misusing prescription drugs. Its website has teaching materials and guides tailored for different age groups.

https://www.generationrx.org/ 

Generation Rx
614-292-2266
info@generationrx.org

Granville Vance Public Health Department

The Granville Vance Public Health Department offers substance misuse services in Oxford and Henderson, including naloxone and a syringe exchange program.

https://gvph.org

Lisa Harrison, Health Director
919-690-2108
lharrison@gvdhd.org

Greensboro Area Health Education Center (AHEC) App

The Greensboro AHEC has created a collaborative app to help Guilford County health providers, citizens and emergency responders easily access relevant information about drug abuse prevention, drop off and treatment options in their area.

Greensboro AHEC
336-832-8025
ahec.customerservice@conehealth.com

Guilford County Drug Treatment Court

The goal of the drug treatment court is to prevent repeat drug offenses and rehabilitate users. Judges may refer defendants to treatment for substance misuse disorder rather than incarceration.

https://www.highpointnc.gov/police

Latisha McNeil
336-412-7905
lflynch@uncg.edu

High Point Drug Market Initiative

The High Point Police Department launched the Drug Market Initiative in 2004 in an effort to reduce drug-related crimes. The initiative partners with neighborhoods to help give people who commit drug-related crimes a second chance by providing assistance in form of day care, employmen